To a World of Unique Cities

World Atlas estimated that 4,416 cities are with a population of over 150,000, and NextCity settled to 10 000 cities on Planet Earth. Our story will take you to a world of four(4) unique cities.

This is the first of many posts that will show you some unique destinations that the world offers. Large, beautiful, attractive, dangerous, or unusual, but definitely unique.

From the mid-5th century to the early 13th century Constantinople was the largest and wealthiest city in Europe. For many centuries, this city was an inspiration for development, subject of envy and object of attacks, city of the world’s desire.

This is the first city that a big part of the world has recognized as a unique city. However, today we have a different approach, and let us see what other cities have grown to be unique.

The sinking Mexico City in Mexico. Mexico City is built on top of an underground reservoir. In addition, it draws more water for the city’s expanding population of over 21 million people.

Therefore the entire city is slowly sinking at a rate of 150-200 mm (6-8 inches) per year. In a world of unique cities, Mexico is a mega Venice. The 21 million people consume nearly 287 billion gallons of water each year.

After all the city has sunk more than 32 feet in the past 60 years because 70 percent of the water people rely on is extracted from the aquifer below the city.

I’ve always thought Mexico City was incredibly dynamic.

by Greg Kinnear

The Old Town of Plovdiv, Bulgaria. The Bulgarian city of Plovdiv was established over 8000 years ago. The city has survived and thrives under:

Alexander The Great, the Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, the Latin Empire, the Ottoman Empire. In addition to WW I, WW II, and the end of the communist USSR. It is in the world’s Top 10 oldest habitable cities list.

Ancient, ancient history and modern life are co-existing to give an astonishing city vibe and experience.

A few years ago the main “Raiko Daskalov” street was converted to a walking zone. The street is 1750m and is the longest walking street in the world.

If you take a walking tour, “The old town” site is around the corner of this main Plovdiv street, full of restaurants, coffee-shops, and merchants.

The city is located approximately 150km east of the capital city, Sofia. Nearby is Pamporovo, a mountain ski-resort with 4 equipped gentle slopes, a ski school for beginners, and a real ski kindergarten. Definitely worth visiting.

Behind a bend of the Maenam, the entire town of Bangkok appeared in sight. I do not believe that there is a sight in the world more magnificent or more striking. This Asiatic Venice…

Krung Thep has been the correct name for the capital of Thailand for more than 130 years. As a matter of fact, foreigners persist in calling it Bangkok. The city has changed its name four times since the foundation in 1767. This is a few years after the destruction of the Thai kingdom’s old Ayutthaya.

The city foundation was at Thonburi, just down the Menam River from Ayutthaya. Also in 1782 King Rama I, began building a new capital on the opposite bank of Bangkok, then a small village. In 1787, two years after completion, the city was named Rattanakosin. All in all, during the reign of Rama III, from 1824 to 1851, the name was altered to Krungthep Maha Nakorn or Krung Thep for short.

Eating street food in Bangkok is an experience.

by Aishwarya Rajesh

Volcano brollies in a world of unique cities or the Japanese set-point of Kagoshima, on the island of Kyushu. In this city, people tend to carry umbrellas even in fine weather.

They use the umbrellas for protection against showers of fire ash that descend on the city, blown over from the nearby volcano of Sakurajima.

The volcano itself was a small island until 1914 when a tremendous eruption spewed forth enough lava and ash to link it with the main island.

So, if you are out and about getting close to an unpredictable volcano and wish to experience Japanese hospitality, visit Kagoshima.

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